UTAH TECH UNIVERSITY'S STUDENT NEWS SOURCE | September 28, 2022

That’s What She Said: “Frozen” rewrites princess stereotype

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Snow White lived in a house with seven men, Mulan impersonated a soldier, Cinderella broke curfew to go to a dance, and no one cares because they kept their clothes on.

The mixed comments about the newest Disney film “Frozen” are unbelievable. Critics said Elsa, the older sister-turned-ice-queen,  has a body that is too sexy for young audiences — girls in particular. 

I grew up watching the Disney princesses, and they changed my life. I always wanted to be a mermaid and swim in the ocean or have a pet tiger and fly on a magic carpet. They showed me what it was like to live my dreams. I don’t think I ever thought, “Hmmm, that princess has a really sexy body, and I don’t.”

I was more enchanted by these girls doing the amazing things I could only dream about. The Disney princesses show little girls what their lives could be if they only take a chance. Isn’t that the ideal life for every little girl?

I don’t understand how the critics can tear apart “Frozen” when, in reality, nothing has changed. Princesses in Disney films present the same body type: slender, beautiful and basically perfect. Anna and Elsa’s body proportions don’t stray too far from this script.

The body type has not changed, but the type of character has. Disney finally created a princess who isn’t scared to be independent. The bond between sisters in “Frozen” is stronger than the love of a man who has to come save the day. The princesses have become more like normal characters. Rapunzel is taking her life into her hands by making a deal with a thief to get out of her tower. Anna isn’t willing to play the damsel in distress; instead she goes out to find her sister on her own.

“Frozen” is one of the best Disney movies to date because the writers decided to try something different. They sent a message to viewers everywhere: It is not OK to marry a man you just met, and sisters really do come before misters. Anna and Elsa didn’t need men to make them complete and happy. Anna was willing to sacrifice her life for the life of her sister, an act of true love that ended up saving her life.

This way of thinking is taking steps in the right direction for viewers who want to see a strong female lead. Next thing we know, it will be the prince stuck in deep, dark pit with the princess leading the charge to save him. 

Disney has a good thing going with the two newest princesses, and if an ice dress and makeup are too sexy for young girls, parents need to rethink letting “The Little Mermaid” and her seashells stay in their homes.

We need to look past the body appearances and see what the characters’ actions are portraying.